Brother to Brother

Standard

unnamedThis week is an exciting one for me and my brother Paul. We spent a good chunk of the last year working on a novel together and we’re releasing it officially on February 4 (Thursday). That book is called Blink. It is centered around Agent Smith, one of the top investigators for The Utility Company, a government agency that takes on the strange and weird cases. What Smith and his team tumble into is an inter-dimensional conspiracy of sorts.

To get people acquainted with both of us, I decided to solicit questions on Facebook on Monday. What follows is a joint session in Google docs where we answered them live and together. It is fun, crazy at times, and sometimes painfully honest. Oh, and our sister (Betsy Baker) crashes the party. A LOT. Don’t mind her. She means well…

Let’s get cracking!


 

370

Us (Will on left, Paul on right)

Jon Frater asks: How about we start with: whose idea was this book, anyway?

W: OK. Ready Paul?

P: Sure. Wait. This is a book? How did that happen?

W: Uh. Not quite sure. It originally just started as a random Facebook post. My forehead was dry, which I guess I found funny or odd or something and I posted about it. I did it the next day and the next day and then they started a life of their own. Like 19 or 20 days later I had a legit story on my hands but it wasn’t right. Then Paul stepped in…(that’s your cue)

P: “You can call me Mr. Smith.” That one little statement sparked something in me. I wanted to know more about Mr. Smith. Where did he come from? How did he come to know about the character Will was writing about? What kind of agency did he represent? Knowing the way Will was approaching things I had an inkling that he didn’t know any of the answers, so I wrote a bunch on my own, submitted to him and…

W: Yeah, you make me sound like a doofus, but that’s cool. No…I really hadn’t even considered much about Agent Smith’s background. To me when I wrote him, he was a cog. A piece of the machine to get my main character to do things. But when Paul presented me with his piece — essentially a parallel story with Smith and his people, it was clear that Smith should be the protagonist. It would have been stupid to keep Smith as the secondary character. And because of that altering of perspective, I believe it made this book what it is, and it will hopefully propel us to write more about Smith and the Utility Company in the future. (It does say Book 1 on the cover after all. No pressure)

That it? We good with that question? yeah.

Bill Matthews asks: I think that you should allow your sister to ask each of you some questions … or tell your tales about both of you growing up.

P: I’m scared.

W: I am really unsure about this. Let’s move on and hope this doesn’t come back to bite us.  

Samuel Peralta asks: Who’s on your dream cast for the movie?

P: Martin Freeman for Nik?

W: oooo…that’s almost eerily perfect. I know he’s been in the new Fargo so he can do an American accent, so I think I would be totally down for that. Agent Smith. I could go with a number of different actors, but let’s go out of the box and say Chiwetel Ejiofor.

P: And…., we’re done folks. Chi. is. awesome.

W: I really didn’t actually include a ton of descriptors for the characters, so there is a lot that can be flexible. Paul’s right. Chi is awesome.

Preston Leigh asks: What was the writing process like? Did one person give plot ideas and the other write the story?

P: One guy goes write, write, write. Other guy eats popcorn and says, “Yay! You’re awesome!” First guy flames out, says, “I’m tired” or “I have no @%$&* clue where this is going.” Other guy takes over.

W: Essentially. But I don’t like popcorn.

P: Or cheese.

W: Oh. I do love cheese. But Paul’s pretty well spot on. We…have a terrible writing process. We could have finished writing this book about 4 or 5 months earlier if we were actually dedicated. We had some basic plot points (usually Paul felt the need to have some kind of outline) and then I usually broke them.

P: yep

Judah Ball asks: Having a little personal insight to your family I know distance between authors was a roadblock. How did you overcome that hurdle?

W: I don’t recall a hurdle. Do you?

P: FaceBook messenger and Google Docs are our friend.

W: Friend is singular. You mentioned two things. That should be friends. Also…where is that hurdle? (But Messenger and Google Docs enabled this when 10 years ago it would have been impossible)

Deirdre Gould asks: Did you give each other Noogies to resolve editing disputes?

P: Can one give a noogie to another person 1500 miles away?

W: Metaphorically. I think. Can you feel that?

P: Ouch.

W: SUCCESS.

Betsy Baker asks: Paul, your birthdays are just eight years and one day apart. How did you feel When he hijacked your party that year?

W: Here we go. Ladies and gentlemen. If you are still reading, I apologize.

P: I’m supposed to remember my 9th birthday? I have enough trouble remembering yesterday.

W: I certainly don’t. Yesterday I mean. And I think she means your 8th birthday. When I was born a day later. She means you had the BEST PRESENT EVAR.

P: I think we had a pretty good tradition of sharing birthdays in our family. We made a pretty big deal about it actually, so it was cool. and EVAR, yep.

Betsy Baker asks: Will, how has your brother influenced your writing style? Do you remember any specific tortures that may have brought you down this path?

W: I guess this is directed at me, so I’ll answer this one. Uh……..Paul was usually pretty cool to me. I don’t know about you, though. But he was 8 years older than me so by the time I got to the point of knowing anything at all, he was already too cool for school, so it wasn’t really until adulthood that we became BFFFFFFFs.

Betsy Baker asks: Paul, younger brothers are notorious pains in the touckus. You’ve suffered this one for well on 36 years now. What is the greatest lesson you have learned from this pain in your butt?

P: Water. It goes under the bridge. Stop taking things so serious.

W: There’s water under your touckus? (and I think the spelling is toochus. maybe touk-us. IDK. Can we not say butt?)

P: I don’t know where you’re taking-us…

W: I don’t think she knows either. 😉

Betsy Baker asks: Will, your handle, has been, in the past, CheeseWill. Please tell us, what is your favorite cheese? The world wants to know!

W: Cheese. There are lesser cheeses or greater cheeses. All the cheeses are wonderful and prized.

Betsy Baker asks:  Paul, knowing how much you love Kraft Velveta, how do you feel about Howard Starks apparent love of processed cheese food?

P: Iron Man’s dad rocks?

W: I think Betsy is confused. I think she’s referring to the part in Captain America when Howard is talking about fondue. Fondue is not a processed cheese food. If I’m incorrect, tell me in the comments cuz I’m confuzzled.

Betsy Baker asks: We grew up with a father who was very much into Science Fiction and Fantasy books. Both of you, which of dad’s favorite authors were also your favorite authors? How did that infuence your current writing style?

P: Isaac Asimov, Ben Bova, David Eddings, Raymond Feist, Terry Brooks, Piers Anthony, David Brin, Anne McCaffrey, Alan Dean Foster, Orson Scott Card, Andre Norton, Larry Niven, Tolkein…  endless really. There are so many books I’m thinking of that I can’t place the author at the moment. I think I just have this deep bank of resource inside my head. As to style… that’s still evolving. But, I know when something’s good when I see it.

W: Asimov. Heinlein. So many others. As for current writing style…….hmmm…I don’t know. I mean the last thing I wrote was a robot story that I really wrote as an homage to Asimov. So probably very influential.

W: Okay Betsy. Thanks for hijacking this perfectly good thread. Anyone else?

Betsy Baker asks: Growing up I remember a time in kindergarten when I the school held a haunted house. I became scared and wouldn’t budge. The school had to call Paul out from his 6th grade classroom to pull me out of the haunted house. Will, do you have any similar protective brother memories of Paul?

W: Sorry. My brain isn’t braining right now. I’ll come back to this one if I can think of anything.

Betsy Baker asks: Will was always an advanced child. He was in multiple advanced level classes in school and somehow always managed to place high in the Pinewood Derby competitions. Paul, how do you see Will’s drive and competitiveness coming through now?

P: Hmmm…. I think it shows up in different ways. He’s driven and committed. He grabs on to the thought of what he wants to do and he pursues it. He’s committed to family and he’s great with them.

W: When I see a pizza, I commit. ALL THE WAY.

Betsy Baker asks: Piggy-backing on a question above a little bit, Will, how do you see Paul’s protective older brother nature come in to play now?

W: We’re really getting deep here, aren’t we. Paul is like the older brother I never had. Wait…he IS the older brother I do have. Anyway…I guess if we’re really looking into it that much, he does try to focus me when I’m flying all over the place on a plot point. He was the one who really directed much of the story in Blink and I honestly believe most of the better points of the book are because of him.

Betsy Baker asks:  Paul moved out of the family home far sooner than any of us would have liked. For a time, though, he lived quite close to you, Will. For writing purposes, I imagine that kind of distance would have suited you much better. How has technology helped and hindered your writing process?

W: OK. Background story time! When we lived in Arizona, Paul left to go to college. Because that’s what you do when you graduate high school. A couple years later we left Paul in Arizona because Dad got a new job in the Chicagoland area. YEARS LATER Paul decides the desert is too hot and when I am graudating from college, he takes a job an hour away from me for two years. We did a lot of stuff together like eating pizza and watching Blade II while he lived close by. Technology…we discussed earlier. Read that.

Betsy Baker asks:  Some of us know that your upcoming, highly anticipated, novel Blink involves inter-reality travel. Knowing that sliding is already a commonly accepted form of inter-reality travel, would you rather hurdle through a mirror, or slide like Quinn?

P: What about folding? Or entering new planes of reality by near-death experiences? or being stabbed in the eye? A simple stroll through a mirror sounds great.

W: Glory…who said anything about getting stabbed in the eye??! That sounds horrible. There is a bit of a B-movie horror vibe to the first quarter of Blink, but from then on, there is more of a straight up chase movie theme going on. In a lot of ways, I guess I borrowed from Star Trek’s mirror universe. Or Fringe. Which I didn’t even realize until after I’d written most of the book. Or co-written, as it were.

Betsy Baker asks: You’re both fathers and you’re both teachers. What is the one thing you seem to teach over and over again no matter if it’s your students or your kids? What is the one thing you have to relearn over and over no matter if it’s your students or your kids? How has that affected your writing and how has that made you a better writer?

P: No mixing of day job and whatever this is. No. Nope. Naw…. ok. this might have taught me patience there….

W: I have to tell my kids to put their names on the papers. I don’t know if that helped anything though.

Betsy Baker asks: Star Wars, Star Trek, Star Gate? Why?

W: Why choose? I would like a sci-fi nachos with all three. And extra guac.

P: Stargate Deep Space 9

W: …Episode VII

Rysa Walker asks: Each should ask the other why mom/dad loved him better. It’s a classic. 

W: Easy answer.

P: Matthew.

W: 🙂 (In hindsight, I think both of us read this question as who did Mom/Dad love better. Ooops)

Betsy Baker asks: You’ve both written some pretty fun stuff now. What character that you’ve written would you trade places with and why?

W: There are definitely a few I WOULDN’T trade places with. That’s for sure. Hmm…Maybe Bek from my story The Control? Maybe Franz in Requiem?

P: I wrote a story that I’m hoping Sam Peralta has seen for the Drifting Isles Chronicles. I really love the character I wrote for that one. He’s my take on Indiana Jones.

W: Cool story, Bro.

P: Bek is quality. There’s something to admire about him.

W: Yeah. I might be biased.

Adam Venezia asks: Will – how does co-writing a novel work? I’m real curious about the logistics of it. Who does what?

W: Did we already kinda answer this? Guess we should put out a FAQ.

P: Yeah cool.

W: I will say that I think you have to co-write with the right person. It wouldn’t work with everyone. We have fairly similar temperaments so neither one of us got bent out of shape when we didn’t get done what we said we’d do. We both like to write, but family and careers sometimes have to take priority, so this book wasn’t always Job #1. For us, we both were laid back enough to make it work.

Harlow C. Fallon asks: Here’s a question: If you (Paul and Will) could go back and change one thing in your life, what would it be, and why?

W: Letting our sister into this interview. LOL! (just kidding! sorta!)

P: Dang. That’s waaaaaaaaay too loaded of a question. If I had to do it all over again and had to make one choice again, it might be to have gone to Illinois with my family back in 1990. It would have been a different adult life. Totally.

W: Dude. That was a long time ago. You’re old. As for me….I don’t know. I hate to change things because there are so many other things that could change based on that one thing and I think even our failures make us into who were are. I worked for about six years at the local newspaper before I started teaching. I dug a huge hole for myself financially, but I learned so many things that I use as a teacher and a writer today.

P: Sure. I see the point. I wouldn’t want to change the last 13 years, but the 14 years before that….?

W: Tempting. For sure. If you could go and accelerate everything that you did right…that would be ideal.

P: If I only knew then what I know now….

W: Stupid hindsight.

…..

W: Is that it? You got any questions for me?

P: I think the crowd was a better interviewer than I could ever be. Good job crowd. Good job Will.

W: I agree. This was fun. A long thing, but fun. Look for Blink on sale Thursday in your local Kindle store.

Meet The Alt.Historians — Adam Venezia

Standard

ALT-History-102-eBook (1)

Alt.History 102 is up in the Top 10 of the Sci-fi Anthology charts and is getting some fantastic reviews, but that doesn’t mean we aren’t done meeting some Alt.Historians! Here is a few words from Adam Venezia. Who is he? I’ll leave that to him to answer…

Give us a brief introduction to you. Who are you? What else have you written? What brings you to Alt.History 102?

A few years ago, I walked away from a PhD program in Structural Engineering to pursue a career in writing. Seven years of studying engineering taught me that science fiction is more fun than science. Alt.History 102 is my first time publishing. Most everything before it has been practicing the craft.

What’s your story about? What gave you the idea for your story?

“The Black Network” is about what would happen if we didn’t have all this lovely access to the internet and computing. But, it’s not about a time before computers were invented. They exist, and are just as powerful as we think of them now. But access is limited, controlled by the wealthy, prohibitively expensive for just about everyone.

If you could pick a previous Chronicles anthology that you could alter history to go back and be included in, which one would it be and why?

Time Travel Chronicles. I actually got into the Chronicles by writing a story just for Sam – a sort of audition piece. Time Travel Chronicles was on the verge of coming out at that time, and I just barely missed my chance to be in that collection. A shame, because time travel is easily my favorite subject within science fiction.

Anything else you’d like to plug?

I recently started a blog. I’ve spent the past few years teaching myself to write, and put up the blog as a way of organizing and sharing what I know so far. That’s at adamvenezia.wordpress.com

Meet The Alt.Historians — Artie Cabrera

Standard

ALT-History-102-eBook (1)

Yesterday was the official launch day for Alt.History 102, but that doesn’t mean the fun has to stop. Alt.Historian Artie Cabrera got in touch with me with his answers to my questions, and in an another reality, he would have met the deadline, so we were just in the wrong continuum…and that’s okay.

Artie has a unique voice in the sci-fi and speculative fiction field. I really dug his story in The Cyborg Chronicles — a space noir if you will — and his twisty tale of Christopher Columbus is a great turn in Alt 102. Now for more from Artie…

Give us a brief introduction to you. Who are you? What else have you written? What brings you to Alt.History 102?

Howdy! My name’s Artie Cabrera. After working in the music industry for twenty-years, I turned my attention and sorrows to writing my first story, an apocalyptic self-help book called I’M NOT DEAD. Since then, I’ve met some really talented writers, learned to sharpen my storytelling tools (I think), and discovered new characters and worlds within myself. Unfortunately, sometimes those worlds and characters have to die when they stop carrying their weight around here. No one lives in my head for free.

What’s your story about? What gave you the idea for your story?

While researching conspiracy theories and UFOs in ancient arts for a story, I came across a very short and vague article about Christopher Columbus and his encounter with a UFO at sea. Even though it sounded ridiculous and probably (definitely) never happened, I was compelled to outline a story around it. I wanted to know more about a story some crazy person started online but never finished. One man’s junk is another man’s treasure. I filed the unfinished story away in the vault of a dozen unfinished stories for a couple of years. When Sam announced Alt. History 102 last year, I thought it was an ideal opportunity to bring it back to life. He said yes. Lucky me. And here we are.

If you could pick a previous Chronicles anthology that you could alter history to go back and be included in, which one would it be and why?

I would probably pick Alien Chronicles first, Galaxy second, just because I love alien stories.

Anything else you’d like to plug?

I’m currently outlining my Jurassic Chronicles story and the sequels to Diablo Del Mar and Johnny Rangers for a summer release. When I’m done, I’m going to try and peddle more stories into The Chronicles if the boss allows it.

Changing History

Standard

Today’s the day!

Alt.History 102 is changing history starting today. From Nikola Tesla to Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Hedy LaMarr to Hannibal, Native American disease resistance to Cold War politics, there are stories in this collection whether you are a history buff, or a sci-fi genre reader to all points in between. I’m super proud to be a part of this collection and my story “Requiem” I believe is one of the finest things I’ve written.

Throughout the past week, I’ve done some interviews with the authors, but before I leave the links below for those, here is the interview Hank Garner (Also an Alt.Historian) did with Samuel Peralta, Jennifer Ellis, Therin Knite, and myself. We had a lot of fun talking together and I think it shows.

Now back to the text interviews. Click on any of the names below for the previous interview.

Will Swardstrom

Drew Avera & Asha Bardon

J.E. Mac

Hank Garner & Therin Knite

Rysa Walker

Jennifer Ellis & Alex Roddie

And I couldn’t leave this without a link to the book, which you can get by simply clicking on the book’s image below. Reviews are already rolling in and so far readers are loving having their histories altered before their very eyes. Go buy it for just 99 cents for a limited time and read it for yourself!

ALT-History-102-eBook (1)

Meet The Alt.Historians — Jennifer Ellis & Alex Roddie

Standard

ALT-History-102-eBook (1)One day away from the official launch of Alt.History 102!! 

(I might be a tad excited…)

I think I said before that when I finished my story “Requiem,” I can honestly say it was one of the toughest challenges I’ve had as a writer — balancing the “real life” aspects of the story with the speculative elements I would add in by changing one or two historical events. I would say that most of the authors in Alt 102 would agree with me, especially the first of my guests today: Jennifer Ellis. Her story leads the collection and is a knock-out. She tackles the story of Hedy LaMarr in a real and emotional way. I appreciated her take on it and it fits the collection to a “T”.

Alex Roddie on the other hand is a new voice to me. I was tangentally aware of him through other work by mutual friends, but this was the first time I have been personally introduced, and I am looking forward to diving into his story later today.

If you missed them, the other interviews so far for Alt.History 102 are here —> Me, Drew Avera & Asha Bardon, J.E. Mac, Hank Garner & Therin Knite, and Rysa Walker.

And now, Jennifer Ellis…


 

Jennifer Ellis

Jenphoto-couch

Give us a brief introduction to you. Who are you? What else have you written? What brings you to Alt.History 102?

I live in the mountains in Canada where where I write, hike, ski, borrow dogs, and evade bears. I also work as a climate change researcher, evaluator and strategic planner. I write mostly science fiction and fantasy. My Derivatives of Displacement series for children and adults is a time travel portal fantasy about the intersection between magic and science. The first novel in that series is A Pair of Docks and I just released the third novel A Grave Tree in November. I’ve also written several stand-alone novels including In the Shadows of the Mosquito Constellation set in the near future after peak oil has caused an economic collapse. I have also been lucky enough to be included in several anthologies such as Synchronic: 13 Tales of Time Travel, Tales of Tinfoil, Tales of the Apocalypse and now Alt. History 102.

I came to Alt. History 102 in part through Synchronic, which Samuel Peralta was also part of, so we had met there, and in part because I submitted a novel to the Future Chronicles one book thread and Samuel checked out some of my other writing. I am extremely excited to be on board.

What’s your story about? What gave you the idea for your story?

I have written an alternate history of Hedy Lamarr, Hitler, and World War II. Hedy Lamarr has always fascinated me. The facts of her life are in many ways stranger than fiction. Born in 1914 to wealthy Jewish parents in Vienna, she was the first woman to appear nude on screen in the controversial movie Ecstasy in 1933. She then married Austrian arms dealer who had dealings with Hitler and Mussolini and entertained both leaders at he and Hedy’s castle home. While fleeing her marriage, Hedy met Louis B. Mayer and was signed immediately to a contract with MGM studios. Dubbed the most beautiful woman in the world, she became a major Hollywood star at the height of the golden age of Hollywood, but she is also credited with inventing frequency-hopping spread spectrum technology, which is the basis for Bluetooth, Wi-fi and many other modern communication methods. Upon receiving her invention, the military immediately classified it, and Hedy was dismissed to help the war effort by selling war bonds. Hedy did not receive credit for her invention until very late in her life when she was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame.

All of these factors create so many delightful what ifs for an alternate history. What if Hedy’s invention was used in World War II? What if Hedy was a spy for the Allies, or the Axis powers, as some have speculated she might have been? What if Hedy had a relationship with Hitler, as has also been speculated? I took these threads and ran with them and had great fun as a result.

If you could pick a previous Chronicles anthology that you could alter history to go back and be included in, which one would it be and why?

So many great Chronicles to choose from, so little time. My original instinct was to say that I would love to be in The Time Travel Chronicles (which I would of course… I would like to be in any Chronicles anthology) as I write time travel fiction and it would be great cross over to my other work. I spend lots of time thinking about various models of time travel, and paradox, and multiple universes, and stuff like that. And of course I would be interested in The Dragon Chronicles as I’m always tempted to throw a dragon or two into my fantasy series. Who isn’t? There will be a dragon somewhere in my future I’m sure. But I think I would like to be part of The Galaxy Chronicles. It would push me more as I have never written a story set in space, but I like to be pushed, and I am of course a huge Star Trek, Star Wars fan. I would like to see what I could deliver in a different galaxy, and I’ve always thought it would be handy to be a Jedi.

Anything else you’d like to plug?

Well you can always buy any of my books. I promise action-packed adventures. The first novel in my Derivatives of Displacement series is only 99 cents. You can find my library here: http://www.amazon.com/Jennifer-Ellis/e/B00H6V6PH8

You can also check out my website at www.jenniferellis.ca where I write about writing, and my upcoming releases and give away short stories.


Alex Roddie

alex

Give us a brief introduction to you. Who are you? What else have you written? What brings you to Alt.History 102?

My name is Alex Roddie, and I’m a freelance writer and editor. I have a background in historical fiction and have written two novels set in the mountaineering culture of 19th century Britain: The Only Genuine Jones and The Atholl Expedition. More recently, I’ve branched out into science fiction. I have written short stories for the anthologies No Way Home and Crime and Punishment, both of which include work from Chronicles authors Lucas Bale and Michael Patrick Hicks. That’s how I became involved in the Future Chronicles project.

In addition to fiction, I’m an outdoor and adventure-travel writer. Backpacking and mountaineering are my passions and I have written content for a number of UK-based outdoor magazines and websites. This year I’m planning a thru-hike of the 500-mile Arctic Trail in Scandinavia.

My day job is editorial work, and I make a living helping other self-published writers to achieve success. I also freelance as sub-editor for Sidetracked Magazine.

What’s your story about? What gave you the idea for your story?

The Locked Web is really two different alternate-history concepts in one. What if the Cold War never ended? and What if the internet never developed? In my story, these two ideas are tightly interwoven. A Soviet cyber-attack in 1982 leads to the microcomputer boom of the eighties failing in the marketplace, and the web is simply never invented. By 2015, Britain is still locked in a bitter war with the USSR and electronic communications are tightly controlled. Small-scale atomic attacks have been a fact of life for twenty years.

Computers have evolved in a weird direction, too, and this is really how I first got the idea for the story. I started to wonder what the world would be like today if small British computing firms such as Acorn, Sinclair and Psion hadn’t died off early, but instead flourished after a hypothetical failure of IBM and Apple. In this alternate history, Britain is the computing powerhouse of the world – but that’s largely irrelevant, because computing has no place in the lives of most people.

In the 2015 of The Locked Web, computers are seen as suspicious and alien objects. Old mainframes and dumb terminals are used in places like national libraries and universities, but the government has access to advanced tech such as e-ink desks. The only unregulated network is the Academic Subnet, and that’s where a new freedom movement arises – the Web Supremacist movement. Mirroring true events, the effort to set information free emerges from academia.

If you could pick a previous Chronicles anthology that you could alter history to go back and be included in, which one would it be and why?

I’d probably pick The Robot Chronicles. I’ve always been interested in robots but have never written about them.

Anything else you’d like to plug?

You can follow me on Twitter at @alex_roddie.

My website is www.alexroddie.com.

 

Meet The Alt.Historians — Rysa Walker

Standard

ALT-History-102-eBook (1)Another day, another introduction to an author for the upcoming anthology Alt.History 102. Today we hear a little from perhaps the most established of all the Alt.History writers — Rysa Walker.

If you aren’t familiar with Rysa, go check out her writing now. Seriously. Timebound was a phenomenal novel and she puts out some great work in science fiction, and specifically time travel. With her stomping about in the past so much, it makes sense that she gets a chance to change it up in Alt.History, which she does wonderfully in her story revolving around Lizzie Borden.

Alt.History 102 publishes on Sunday, January 31 and we’ve had a few other interviews already this week — me, Drew Avera & Asha Bardon, J.E. Mac, and Hank Garner & Therin Knite.

But now, it’s my privilege to introduce you to Rysa Walker…


 

Rysa Walker

RysaWalker_sm

Give us a brief introduction to you. Who are you? What else have you written? What brings you to Alt.History 102?

I’m Rysa Walker, author of The CHRONOS Files series, which is time travel…but also, alternative history, since my characters do quite a bit of mucking around with the timeline. This is my second story in the Future Chronicles.  In my pre-writing life, I was a history professor, and I’ve always enjoyed the “What if…” questions the most, because there are so many aspects of history where a tiny change could have made a major difference.  And so much of the history we study is really “alt. history” anyway, because–as was the case in this story–the details that end up being accepted as “history” are often exaggerated or flat-out wrong.

What’s your story about? What gave you the idea for your story?

Simon Rand is one of the key characters in my CHRONOS Files books is Simon Rand. He’s a villain, but history junkies like me will probably find it hard to entirely hate Simon.  Yes, he alters the timeline a bit. And yes, he’s got a bit of blood on his hands. But hey–that’s his day job.  If he had his way, he’d toss all that aside and be a full-time time-tourist.

This is the second Simon story I’ve written, and there’s a third one planned for late spring. When I finished the final book in The CHRONOS Files, Time’s Divide, Simon was the character who just wouldn’t shut up and let me move on to The Delphi Project.  Both of these stories, and a third one that I plan to write this spring, show readers a side of Simon that wasn’t fully explored in the main books of the series.  And I think “Whack Job,” in particular, helps explain why Simon developed his taste for extreme time-tourism, where he lands right in the thick of the action.

If you could pick a previous Chronicles anthology that you could alter history to go back and be included in, which one would it be and why?

Hmm…tough call.  Probably Robot Chronicles or A.I. Chronicles.  I have a story idea that I think would have fit well in both of those.

Anything else you’d like to plug?

The first book in my new series, The Delphi Project, will be published by Skyscape in October. It lies somewhere in the nexus of the X-Files and X-Men.  Readers who enjoyed “Whack Job,” will probably like my CHRONOS novella, Simon Says: Tips for the Intrepid Time Traveler, which was published back in December on Kindle and which will be released on Audible in the next few days. Simon will also be featured in an upcoming graphic novel project that I’m working on.

 

Meet The Alt.Historians — Hank Garner & Therin Knite

Standard

ALT-History-102-eBook (1)As we get every closer to the official launch date for Alt.History 102, I’m thrilled to introduce two more of the authors in this outstanding anthology. So far, I’ve interviewed myself, Drew Avera & Asha Bardon, and J.E. Mac. Thankfully, I recovered from James’ interview enough for some more and today I bring you Hank Garner and Therin Knite.

I’ve known Hank for a little while now with each of us kind of orbiting each other in different ways and at different times. I’m so glad to be able to share some pages with him in Alt 102 — I’m a huge fan of his writing. I’m happy to see him in one of Samuel Peralta’s collections.

I first read Therin’s story Venus in Red over a year ago in The Telepath Chronicles. It was one of my favorites of the collection and I’m excited to see what she’s got for us in the vein of alternate history.

On another note, I talked to both Hank and Therin the other night when we recorded the next episode of Hank Garner’s Author Stories podcast. It should be up on Friday with me, Therin, Samuel Peralta and Jennifer Ellis. We had a blast recording it, so hopefully it is just as much fun to listen to. Check it out if you get a chance.

Now…on to Hank and Therin…


Hank Garner

10708526_289621877893288_775975125300147632_o

Give us a brief introduction to you. Who are you? What else have you written? What brings you to Alt.History 102?

My name is Hank and I’m a writer of strange stories. I am a husband and father, which keeps me really busy, but I find time to tell stories and host a weekly podcast. I’ve written three novels. Bloom, Mulligan and Seventh Son of a Seventh Son, and the new serial Writer’s Block all take place in a fictional town in the Mississippi Delta. This town is one of those places where the veil between this world and the next is a little thinner than most.

I am in Alt.History 102 at the invitation of Samuel Peralta. He emailed and asked if I would be interested and I jumped at the opportunity.

What’s your story about? What gave you the idea for your story?

My story is a big “what if” story. I started with a bit of a conspiracy theory premise. Some people believe that an alien craft crashed at Roswell New Mexico in 1947. They also believe that we obtained that wreckage and reverse engineered the alien technology and that is the reason for the technological jumps we have made in the last 60 or so years. I took that idea and spun it. What would happen if all that was true, but that it happened now instead of then? And what if the aliens crashed on purpose to allow us to get their technology? And what if they had been interfering with our progress for thousands of years?

I’m not exactly sure where the idea came from, other than I love a good alien conspiracy story.

If you could pick a previous Chronicles anthology that you could alter history to go back and be included in, which one would it be and why?

If I could go back and contribute to any other anthology, it would have to be The Time Travel Chronicles. I love the idea that events can be changed and manipulated, and then explore the fallout from those actions. Nearly everything I write has at least a small element of time travel, or dimensional travel.

Anything else you’d like to plug?

I host a podcast at hankgarner.com. It comes out weekly (sometimes more often) and it’s a lot of fun. I get to pick the brains of successful people and that has been a huge help to my writing. I hope it will help you as well.

I also am currently writing a series called Writer’s Block. It’s about a writer that is under a deadline and can’t finish. He is confronted with the ghosts of his past, as well as people that may or may not be from this world. Oh, and he has a magic typewriter that makes everything he types on it come true.


Therin Knite

Screenshot 2016-01-27 at 9.27.22 PM

Give us a brief introduction to you. Who are you? What else have you written? What brings you to Alt.History 102? 

Hi! I’m Therin Knite. I write snarky sci-fi thrillers, including the Echoes and Arcadian Heights series. I also have a short story called Venus in Red in The Telepath Chronicles. I was invited by Sam to contribute a story to Alt.History 102, which, of course, I was happy to do.

What’s your story about? What gave you the idea for your story? 

My Alt.History story is called The Blackbird Sings. It’s based on the idea that the USSR launched a nuclear assault on the Pacific Coast in the early eighties, leading to the rise of cybernetics in place of personal computing in the 80s and 90s. In modern times, instead of handheld technology and WiFi, everybody’s a cyborg, with all the tech inside their bodies. The story follows a decorated FBI agent as she hunts down an assassin in the ruins of the West.

If you could pick a previous Chronicles anthology that you could alter history to go back and be included in, which one would it be and why? 

Ironically enough, that’d be The Time Travel Chronicles. I was originally slated to be in it, but I had some unexpected stuff happen near the deadline and had to drop out. 

Anything else you’d like to plug?

You can find me at www.therinknite.com, and, if you like FREE stuff and book release news, you should join my newsletter: http://eepurl.com/bDx7Qv.