Maybe We Should Stop Comparing Books to Music and Instead Look To A Different Industry

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First off — I apologize for the ridiculously long blog title. However, I needed to write it down somewhere and the title seemed as good a place as anywhere else. 

Oftentimes the book industry — particularly those associated with it, like authors, editors, and readers — have a habit of referring to the early days of digital music when Napster allowed me to listen to literally anything I wanted. The music industry wasn’t prepared and suffered for a while. Thanks to iTunes, they have been able to survive, but the new digital age has provided new opportunities for independent artists and bands. 

I would argue that the latter aspect, while an important part of today’s music scene, was really always a part. The digital nature of the Internet has just allowed those bands to receive more exposure. Where does a lot of that exposure come from? 

YouTube. 

A band or singer writes a song, films themselves singing it (perhaps with some crazy and wacky props) and it goes up on YouTube with a viral hit a prayer away. We’ve seen this happen over and over. Sometimes this is an artist already signed to a contract like Psy from South Korea or OK Go. What about Rebbecca Black of the Friday fame (and I know just by mentioning it, that song is playing incessantly in your heads)? Let’s get away from the professionals and semi-professionals…what about the Mom and Dad who filmed themselves lip-syncing to Frozen’s “Love is an Open Door,” while their daughter sat oblivious in the backseat? (15 million hits on that sucker, by the way.)

All of these benefited from the nature of YouTube — where a person or small group can record themselves (possibly on a very tight budget) doing what they do best and putting it out there for the world to see. This is more analogous to the modern state of publishing today, I believe. 

Let’s take a look at John and Hank Green. They were not the first to have a vlog, but their Vlogbrothers channel on YouTube has been the force behind a lot of successful projects. (Last time I counted, between the two of them, the Greens had an interest in over a dozen YouTube channels from their normal twice-a-week vlog, a video game channel, educational science and history channels, the pioneering Brain Scoop among many others). Hank Green is also the originator of Vidcon, which just wrapped up in Anaheim, California. 

According to their website: 

VidCon is for people who love online video. Independent creators, enablers, viewers and supporters of all kinds. The ways that we entertain, educate, share, and communicate are being revolutionized. The creators attending and on-stage at VidCon are central to that revolution. The best part is, we’re having the time of our lives doing it.

Sounds a lot like the Independent writing and publishing community to me. In just a short time, I have written and published a few novels and a handful of short stories. Along the way I have made friends — from fellow authors, bloggers, editors, and even those who prefer to just read. The independent author with a negative outlook on their craft is rare and those who refuse to cooperate are even rarer in my experience. (In fact, in the last few days, I’ve written a blurb promoting a fellow author’s new space opera, and helped to beta-read another friend’s final installment in a four-part science fiction novel — neither one I would have done if those friends hadn’t shown their kindness to me on previous occasions. We lift up each other’s successes; by doing so, our own work may benefit, but it may not. We do it because we love this stuff. 

John and Hank have been in the mainstream news a lot lately because John is also the author of the Young Adult hit, The Fault in Our Stars. The press had difficulty understanding how John and Hank built their online community, affectionately known as “Nerdfighters,” which I will profess to being. These companies want to build these “genuine” communities like the Nerdfighters, but they don’t understand the time, the patience, and the hard work that goes into it. Also the “genuine” part. 

Now…I can’t help think of my friend Hugh Howey here as well. (Yes, this is a rare instance where we get to compare, not contrast Hugh and John Green.) After I had been following the Vlogbrothers for a couple years, I found myself getting into the books on my Kindle, notably WOOL. I wasn’t the only one. Greatness seemed to be thrust upon Hugh to a certain extant, but as far as I can tell, along the way he has been nothing but gracious and receptive to his multitude of fans, interacting with them on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube (!), even his own website, where he responded to tons of fan responses to a blog post earlier today. He has genuinely built an online community where his fans will follow and read just about anything he writes (even love stories from Europe!).

So why do authors compare their books to the music industry? I guess since we write the book and put it on Amazon for people to purchase, just like a band might record an album and put it on iTunes. However, I would argue we shouldn’t compare it to music — but rather to the YouTube phenomena. 

Maybe we can make the following comparisons:

Hardback books are like Hollywood Movies. Not all hardbacks sell great, but they are the best the book industry can put out there. Hardbacks are usually only manufactured with a significant investment and Hollywood movies are much the same. Some books don’t sell even in hardback and some movies are unseen as well (John Carter, Lone Ranger, etc…). 

Paperback books are like television shows. Paperback books are everywhere and the number of television channels seems to increase each day as well. You can find just about anything in paperback and TV offers so many niche shows. Some do well…some don’t. 

Independently published books are like YouTube videos. Indie authors put their heart and soul into their books, but there is still a bit of luck that gets that book to chart and rocket up the charts. Even quality books can languish without the “right” group of people finding that book and reading it. Same goes for YouTube videos. You can watch a dozen videos and maybe one will have the legs to go viral. Why does a video of a cat playing the piano become a worldwide sensation? Why does Fifty Shades of Grey do the same? Some questions will never be answered. 

Now…fellow indie authors, I am not saying this to mean anything negative about your books or the craft of writing. In fact, I honestly believe some of the most inventive, most creative, most compelling stories being created on film are shown on YouTube first. There is a reason why those previously mentioned Hollywood movies and TV shows are clamoring for YouTube hits as well. Hollywood is mining YouTube for their next stars and Jimmy Fallon’s YouTube channel has millions of subscribers. In fact, Fallon’s bits are specifically designed to have a viral factor most nights. 

There is an appeal to YouTube, just as there is more and more of an appeal of Indie Publishing. It’s cool. It is the cutting edge place to be. Where else can you find Amish Science Fiction stories? Where else can you get an American writing just like Neil Gaiman? If the publishing industry continued to exist as it did 50 years ago, you wouldn’t get traditionally-published books by Ernie Lindsey, Ann Christy, Stefan Bolz, Michael Bunker, Jason Gurley, or even me. But because of digital innovations from YouTube as well as Amazon, we are getting the best content we ever have. 

Now, I’m not hip-deep in the world of visual media as I am with books right now, so I don’t know if this is true, but from the outside it appears as though the movies, TV, and online content each have their own place and can coexist. If this is true for them, why can’t it be true for hardbacks, paperbacks, and indie published books as well?

 

 

 

We can go down the list and find dozens of 

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Book Reviews – The Fourth Sage & Super

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Oh boy — been a while since I’ve updated this thing. Don’t need to get super-personal, but suffice it to say the past couple weeks have been CRAZY busy. I had a couple conferences to go to, I made a trip to an airport, I hosted my parents and brother at my house to make some much-needed home repairs and updates for five days — it has been crazy.

So, just wanted to ease back into this and give you reviews on not just one, but two books I recently read. I polished off Stefan Bolz’s new book The Fourth Sage about a week ago and then devoured Ernie Lindsey’s Super over the past 24 hours. Both were tremendous and are showcasing how independent authors are putting out outstanding work.


The Fourth Sage – Stefan Bolz

Earlier this year, I read Stefan Bolz’s previous book, The Three Feathers. I thought it was outstanding with a unique voice in a sea of books with generic personalities and stock plots. With The Fourth Sage, Stefan has proved that he is not a one-trick pony and has continued his specific brand of writing to a futuristic world inhabited by Aries and her friends.

10338227_10203080505026343_2241684756519716173_nIn The Three Feathers, Bolz really put a lot of emphasis on fate and destiny to go along with a heavy dose of supernatural and spirituality. There are recurrences of those themes here as well, but with the futuristic corporate society, the metaphysical side is tempered with the science and technology found in Aries’ world. I really enjoyed reading The Fourth Sage and kept rooting for Aries and her friends, even as the deck was continuously stacked against them. Sacrifices are necessary for journeys like Aries’ to succeed, but sacrifice doesn’t always mean the same thing.

There is a positivity present in Bolz’s work that you don’t find in other author’s books. In a post-apocalyptic, authoritarian society, you would expect to find death and depression around every turn, but for some reason, whenever Aries, her winged friend, Born of Night, or any of her numerous friends appear on the page, it is difficult to not smile and know that somehow, someway, their destiny is to survive and even thrive.

Stefan has planned more books in this series and I am very much interested in reading the future installments. Fantastic book, Stefan — good work.


 

Super – Ernie Lindsey

Perhaps the best movie I’ve seen this year was Captain America: Winter Soldier. One of the best things about the narrative of CA2 was the idea that the government (S.H.I.E.L.D.) was directly funding and operating superhero missions around the world. The implications of that, specifically when you combine it with NSA data mining and Edward Snowden, made the movie much more than a superhero flick — it became a modern allegory for our world with Captain America representing the American ideal.

superI didn’t come into reading Ernie Lindsey’s Super with CA2 in mind, but it is hard to distance yourself too much from it after finishing and realizing the complex web Lindsey wove to get to the ending of the book. The protagonist, Leo Craft, is a Superhero Assassin, a distinction he makes at one point to say the Support Group is joins is not superheros that are assassins, but rather people who assassinate superheroes. At first, this sounds terrible, until Lindsey carefully reminds the reader that no one is perfectly good or evil — that shades of grey exist. For some heroes, those shades are lighter, but for others, those shades take on tones of child pornography, abuses of their powers, and betrayal of their countries. For some of those, Craft takes out retribution.

It seems Craft is perfect at his job, but gets a little lazy and doesn’t realize who he hopped into bed with on his latest assignment. From there, the government twists and turns with numerous agencies and multinational organizations takes center stage with Lindsey expertly leaving the reader wanting more at each chapter break. This is one book that I genuinely had a hard time putting down and when my Kindle ran out of battery life, I had to bide my time until it was ready for me to finish the book off.

I thought Lindsey did a great job and left the world open and ripe to numerous other stories or sequels, each of which I would gladly purchase and read. Well done!

Book Review – Eleanor

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There are many different reasons to read a book. Most times I tend to read to think about something in a new or different way. To spark my creativity and challenge my accepted ideas.

EleanorThis book, Eleanor by Jason Gurley, is not that kind of book. Not that it doesn’t make you think. I had a lot of thoughts while I read this book. I thought about the similarities between it and two other books I’ve read. One was fairly recent – Neil Gaiman’s Ocean at the End of the Lane, while the other I read when I was just a child – Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time. Both had a profound influence on me, but all three of these books didn’t so much make me think.

They made me feel.

When I first began reading Eleanor, I was struck by the pictures Mr. Gurley paints for his readers. Spending a little time in Oregon and on the coast of the Pacific Ocean, I could readily accept the fog-shrouded town and seaside he presented as real. He worked so hard to place his story in the real world that when the supernatural world opens up later in the book, it feels natural. It feels like an extension of the world Gurley has created and it feels better than the world in which his characters reside.

I’ve followed Jason’s journey of writing this book for the past year (although he’s been writing it for the past 13 years) and I can feel the passion he had for it in every word I encountered. I saw the care he put into it and the work he put in to make it just right.

How to describe this book? I’m not really sure. I literally finished less than five minutes after starting to write this review, so my thoughts are still swirling like the water in a tide pool off the shore of a small island near the beach in Oregon. I felt for the characters that Mr. Gurley painstakingly presented to the readers. How in just the first few pages, we were introduced to Hob, Eleanor and their daughter Agnes. I was getting settled in for a book about this Eleanor, until Gurley ripped the rug out from underneath me and I realized this was not really the titular character – she was still to be discovered.

Discovered is really a great word for this book. Eleanor discovers so much in her journeys throughout this book. You see the younger Eleanor taking care of her family as best she knows how, but then through other means, we see there are better ways she can take care of her family. She discovers who she is, who her parents really are, and her true purpose.

This needs to be discovered. I could call Jason Gurley the American Neil Gaiman and I don’t think many people would argue after reading this book. It is a phenomenal book and one I could not put down. Well done, Mr. Gurley.

We should ALL read YA books (If you want)

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I just finished reading this missive by Slate’s Ruth Graham, where she admits people can read whatever they want, but they should feel embarrassed when…if they decide to even pick up a Young Adult novel — what she calls “children’s books.”

Ms. Graham is wrong. I don’t know anything about her; the Slate biography page about her only says she is a writer from New Hampshire. But, I am not embarrassed to read Young Adult, nor should anyone else feel that way.

TFIOSWhile I haven’t read all the books she mentioned in the piece, I have read John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars, which movie’s release is why Ms. Graham feels compelled to attack Young Adult literature at this point in time. TFIOS is a monumental work, Young Adult or not. I’ll confess I was an very early fan. I pre-ordered the book months before its release and my book has both John Green’s signature, as well as a Hanklerfish as drawn by his brother, Hank. (Nerdfighters know what I’m talking about.)

You can certainly make arguments about the quality of some Young Adult books that have been overhyped (I stopped reading the Twilight series after the second book and my dislike for the third book of the Divergent series is well-known among my friends). However, what harms Young Adult books is also what makes them great.

Passion.

Here is what is missing about Graham’s argument. She claims once you reach the age of 18 (and apparently enlightenment), you must automatically crave adult books. Literary fiction. She says:

But I remember, when I was a young adult, being desperate to earn my way into the adult stacks; I wouldn’t have wanted to live in a world where all the adults were camped out in mine. 

How pretentious. That teenagers need to aspire to read something besides what they have. When I was a teenager, no one was telling me what I could and couldn’t read — I wasn’t desperate to “earn my way into the adult stacks,” because I could already go there and read books from there already. I wasn’t clamoring to read books by the Bronte sister. I did read “adult” books before I had my driver’s license and you know what?

I hated them.

I will never read a Gore Vidal book again after a failed attempt when I was in high school. His Lincoln may have been the worst reading experience of my life. I certainly read non-Young Adult books now, but most of the books I do read have the “passion” in common.

Adolescents think with their heart, not with their head. As a high school teacher, this is both the best and worst thing about them. If you know how to communicate with teenagers, you can earn their trust and loyalty, but when you betray that trust, it is almost impossible to gain back.

To think you’ve moved on and won’t ever read a Young Adult book again, does NOT mean everyone is like you. I certainly hope people have varied tastes. She specifically mentions the books The Westing Game and Tuck Everlasting and that she has no desire to go back and re-read them.

I have a confession to make. Last year, I went back and re-read The Westing Game. I remembered the feelings I had in junior high when I read it and wanted to re-experience those feelings, even in a small way. It doesn’t detract from my adult-ness. It doesn’t mean I regret growing up and want to escape my job and responsibilities. It simply meant I loved it and wanted to find out if it still held up, all these years later. I also re-read Tuck back about four or five years ago just to re-experience the same feelings.

I have another confession to make. I don’t think I’m strong enough to re-read The Bridge to Terebithia. That book wrecked me as a kid. I read it when I was in fourth or fifth grade and while I loved it, there are a lot of childhood feelings I’m afraid to encounter again. Just because of this article, I think I may have to challenge myself to read it again.

And that’s the thing. The passion that is inherent about so many of these books is what makes them so great. Naturally most people lose that passion and emotion when they reach a certain age. Do they then move on to James Joyce and Hemingway?

Nope.

Most people stop reading. Would I prefer people read, even it if has the label of “Young Adult?” Yes. Yes, I would.

We shouldn’t be shaming people for their reading choices, especially when the criticism centers around so many great books available today, like TFIOSHunger Games, Divergent, etc…

“But they don’t get people thinking!” a Ruth Graham apologist might say. Bull. I read the Neal Shusterman novel, Unwind, a couple years ago. You want to think? Read that book — if it doesn’t get your brain going, you’ve got some major issues. It may be couched in the emotion of a teenager, but the thoughts that swirl around in your head…

One book isn’t good enough? Try Feed by M.T. Anderson, The Giver by Lois Lowry, The Book Thief by Markus Zuzak, and I haven’t even mentioned Harry Potter or Katniss Everdeen. There are deep thoughts in each of these books. There are aspects that push people to think differently about the world around them. They are excellent books and it doesn’t take an “adult” label to be classified as such.

Ultimately, I feel sorry for Ms. Graham. If she wasn’t allowed to read adult books as a teenager, perhaps that is why she feels the way she does today. Another thing about teenagers is they want what they can’t have. If that was the “forbidden fruit” of her childhood, maybe that is why she grasps so tightly to it today.

Read what you want. If it doesn’t fit in a specific genre, who cares? Read.

Another great view on this by Lauren Davis from io9.

Double Movie Day – Wolverine & Gravity

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I don’t get a chance to watch a double feature too often, but last night, I rented two movies I missed when they were out in theatres. Once school starts in the fall, it gets a lot more difficult for me to get to the movies, so Wolverine and Gravity slipped by me. (I also don’t subscribe to Netflix — just don’t have the time to justify the expense — so I actually rented these from the local gas station that does rentals. Life in a rural town.)

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Starting with Wolverine, I’m super glad I got this one for a few reasons. First — can’t go wrong with mutants, ninjas, samurai warriors, and Hugh Jackman. Seriously — I think I could watch that guy in anything. The concept is great — what if you take away what makes Wolverine fearless? With his quick-healing abilities stripped away, you see Wolverine become vulnerable. He is already dealing with the after-effects of X-Men 3 and the death of Jean Grey, but when you add in the physical limitations, you see him at his most desperate.

I’m also grateful I decided to rent this one since I’m probably going to see Days of Future Past later today or this weekend. While I probably could have gone in without seeing Wolverine goes to Japan, it certainly will help fill in a few blanks. I’ve tried to stay away from a ton of spoilers for the new movie, but I’ve also heard Bryan Singer makes some timeline changes, which may undo what was done to the X-Men Universe in the the third movie, which he abandoned in favor of Superman Returns. 

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Once that was done, I grabbed some grub, then settled in for Gravity. I wanted to wait until the sun went down and I made sure to rent the Blu-Ray. Was it as impressive as seeing it IMAX 3-D — I highly doubt it, but I can imagine the enormity of seeing it on the really big screen and seeing it last night in the comfort of my living room impressed me.

Just the description is either terrifying or electrifying — only two actors on screen (!), with the bulk of the movie with only one of them portraying the vastness and danger of space. Sandra Bullock. Wow. What a performance without actually going into space itself. George Clooney was also fantastic in his role as Bullock’s guide/mentor/conscience.

There was a moment — and if you’ve seen it, you know what I’m talking about — when I thought about how when I put my earbuds in my pocket and then pull them out and I have to solve the Gordian Knot to get them usable again. While I was fairly confident that Bullock’s character would survive the movie, there were so many moments that would have stopped me and left me wondering when the end would come.

I don’t usually watch the special features on a movie much anymore, but after watching Gravity, I had to watch these. How they simulated the space and microgravity, the lighting, everything that went into it. I think that, more than anything, is the magic of what Director Alfonso Cuaron did here. The technology they had to basically invent just to make this movie work.

Both fabulous movies and it made for a great night at home.

(And I still made time for writing!)

Baking With Swords: My Take

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Concept 3With all the blog posts I’ve shared lately, I haven’t offered my own take on Baking With Swords — why I decided to collaborate with my brother and sister, and what prompted me to write the story I included.

While I was whittling down the days until I was finished writing and editing Dead Sight, back in February and March, I started writing a short story. I never had any ambition beyond it being a short story that I would just release as a stand-alone tale, similar to the first story I’d ever written and published, Perfect Game.

I happened to say something on Facebook about it, and my brother, Paul, asked if I could wait to publish it until he was done writing a story. (Here is his story on how he started writing.) It was a strange request, so I waited a little bit. After some more inquiry, I found out he wanted to just throw it in at the end of my story as a “bonus” of a sort to any potential readers.

I read his story — or at least, what it was at that time. It was good. There was some great ideas in it and it just needed some polishing. It was better than just an unmentioned add-on to a little short story I was writing. I also knew my word count on A Whimper wasn’t going to be much — probably 6-8,000 words — and his was going to be about the same.

So, I proposed the idea of splitting the book title, or even inviting our sister, Betsy, along for the ride. I knew she had been dabbling with writing fiction since I started my publishing journey and figured maybe she had something she could work up fairly quickly. (Read more about her road to her inclusion here.)

Betsy was game, so I put my story on the backburner for a little while. School took over and I let the two of them tinker and finish their stories. In the end, each of our stories clocked in at roughly the same length — about 7,000 words a piece.

I love Paul’s story because it really is heartfelt. There is a lot of emotion from his main character, Max, and the choices he has made in his life. Obviously Paul isn’t Max, but you can see the questions he has asked are questions Max faces as well.

Betsy’s story fits her, as well. She is a mother to two little boys, both under the age of four. There are so many fears and insecurities that accompany being a parent to a toddler and an infant and she confronts them head-on in this tale. Paul and I really challenged her in the editing process and I think she came out of it with a great story that will connect with a lot of readers.

As for my story? Well, I shared a bit of it with you a few months ago. (Here’s that link.) I must’ve read some technology story, or even Michael Bunker’s Pennsylvania, and thought of the ramifications should we ever have chips in our heads (PIPs as I call them in A Whimper). What would the effects be? I think there are so many effects worldwide that I really could have written a full-length novel, but I chose personal ones to the main character. It is told first person and my brother said the tone reminded him of Ready, Player One, which is a huge compliment and may be true since I had just re-read it prior to starting the work on it.

How will the end come for humanity? Will it go out in a blaze of glory, or will it go in a whimper? Most books and stories choose the former, but I wanted a look at the latter.

I’ll confess I’m not the closest person to his family. I don’t talk to them much. I last talked on the phone to my mother probably two weeks ago (Reminder to myself to get on that), and Facebook and text messaging is the best way to get a hold of my brothers and sister. I live in Southern Illinois, one brother lives in northern Illinois, my sister in Michigan, and my older brother in Oregon. We are spread out, but when it counts, we are there for one another.

I don’t know if Paul and Betsy will continue to write and publish, but with my limited expertise, I wanted to be able to help them on their first trip into self-publishing.

As of this writing, the collaboration has received five reviews, four of which are five-star and the other is four-star. I would love to hear back from anyone else who has read it. Really, you should buy the book for my brother and sister and hopefully my story in this book is the bonus, not their’s.


Oh…don’t forget about the BWS Launch Party Monday on Facebook. <– Click there to join.

Find the link and the massive amount of giveaways I’ve got scheduled right here —> LOOK AT ALL THESE GIVEAWAYS!

 

Book Review – Binary Cycle: Skyward

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I owe a lot to W.J. Davies. He may not even know it, but he was a huge inspiration when I first started writing last year. Of course, I’ve well-documented my reliance on Hugh Howey and his blog in the early part of 2013 and it was really Hugh’s story that encouraged me to get started with my career in self-publishing. But, it was a blog post by Howey about Davies in January 2013 that propelled me on the course I find myself now.

I had been writing my novel, Dead Sleep, for a couple weeks already and had made good progress when I saw Hugh tell about Davies’ WOOL fanfiction story, The Runner. Being a fan of WOOL, I grabbed the Kindle copy and devoured it. I determined pretty soon afterwards that when/if I finished my novel, a WOOL story would be the next thing I wrote as a tribute to Hugh Howey. I think Davies’ connection to my journey is clear from there, but then when I was actively writing The Veil, I got to know Davies on Twitter and found his existing knowledge of publishing and the burgeoning WOOL Universe to be a boon. He was generous and friendly when he could have blown me off as an unknown author.

(Full disclosure: both Davies and I have stories in the charity anthology, WOOL Gathering.)

WJDavies_Disruption_web-187x300But it isn’t just WOOL fanfiction that has contributed to Davies’ young writing career. His sci-fi series, Binary Cycle, recently wrapped up with a action-packed, killer ending in BC: Skyward.

I loved the first installment in Davies’ original series, named Binary Cycle: Disruption. Allow me to quote myself from my Amazon review of it:

When I was a child, I devoured Isaac Asimov’s books — especially his Robot and Foundation books, which he ended up combining near the end of his life. As I read WJ Davies’ Binary Cycle: Disruption, I found myself going back to those days in junior high and high school, lying on my bed and dreaming of a world different than our own, yet similar in many ways.
The world Davies has dreamed up – Taran – is on the brink of disaster. A colony of a dying Earth, it has been left to itself since its founding and planetary forces are threatening its very existence. But, that’s just the foundation for the story as Davies interweaves characters through various places on the planet as these disruptions are having different effects — biological, physical, political — and the characters are all wonderfully crafted to the delight of this reader.
I really found myself identifying with the character Jonathas as he navigated a disaster area in search of his girlfriend and the new-found technology recently implanted into his bloodstream.
The book ends on a doozy of a note and I am really looking forward to the next installment in this series from Davies.

That was July of last year. If there was anything that Davies series suffered from, it was time. He didn’t get Part 2, Revelations, published until early March. He learned his lesson, though, and recently released the conclusion, Skyward, to his series in late May.

BCS-187x300Revelations continued the stories of the main characters Davies set up in the first part, but Jonathas’ story was noticeably cut short. Not so in the third installment as Jonathas was arguably the main character and hero of the entire series by the time the end of the story came.

The four main characters — Jonathas, Cassidy, Skyia, and Reggie — are all brought together as their storylines converged in Skyward with all having a part to play in saving the planet Taran. Again, I really identified with Jonathas, but Davies did a great job developing all the characters so when all their commonalities were laid bare, the reader really feels connected and cares about the outcome of the planet. While the second part of the series is titled Revelations, we get a ton of new revelations in this book, especially early on as we try to put all the pieces in place in the journey to save the planet.

The action is taken to a new level and after the early revelations in the book, Davies pushes his characters physically and emotionally, so much that the reader is left panting by the end of the book. In the end, Davies wraps it all nicely, but leaves room for additional tales to be told from Taran, which I would definitely welcome. Binary Cycle proved that W.J. Davies can write outside of the silo and is someone to pay attention to in this new indie publishing world.